Faux Fur. Don’t buy faux fur.

I used to love faux fur and I had several coats, jackets with faux fur collars, purses…
I’m not buying faux fur anymore for two reasons:
-To start with because people can think that this is real fur and I don’t want to get the message across that it’s ok to wear fur.
I have come into Animal Rights because i watched a video of a little fox anally electrocuted for his fur. I was so shocked, so upset that I spent the day crying.I didn’t know that such horror existed.
I put these emotions into action.Poor animals. I love so much animals and it hurts me so much to see what they are doing to them for vanity.

-Fake fur is real fur in many cases now.

Please read this article:

Are you opposed to wearing fur? It will be an unwelcome surprise, then, to learn that you may have some hanging in your closet.

“Fur is back in a big way,” Jezebel has announced. Winter coats sport fur trim around the hoods, but that is just the beginning. Jezebel says that designer houses’ shows previewing their fall lines were heavy on fur, including those of BCBG Max Azria, Caroline Herrera, Ralph Lauren and J. Mendel.

Sadly it looks like time to break out the red paint again. But how can we distinguish between real and fake fur coats, and between people who knowingly bought real fur and people who thought their fur was fake?

People who oppose fur buy it accidentally because some clothing manufacturers and sellers are mislabeling it as “faux fur.” Much of it is from raccoon dogs (see the picture above). Both manufacturers and sellers know that Americans are less likely to buy fur if they think it came from a dog or cat, so they say it didn’t.

The fur of rabbits and other animals also winds up mislabeled as faux fur, perhaps because manufacturers realize that there is widespread opposition to using animals for fur and want to capture more customers than they could if they admitted the fur was real. I can’t think of any other reason businesses would mislabel clothing, especially since their inaccurate labels violate federal law.

An investigation into New York City’s popular discount department store Century 21 revealed real furs masquerading as fake both in the store and online. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and New York Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal conducted an undercover probe and discovered that garments with real fur lining and others with real fur trim were labeled as faux fur or were not labeled at all.

HSUS then went online and bought three Marc Jacobs jackets from Century 21′s website, which described the garments as having fake fur trim. When the jackets arrived, lo and behold — they carried labels stating that the trim was real fur from China. HSUS had the trim on one of the jackets examined and confirmed that it came from a raccoon dog. Under New York law both manufacturers and retailers are liable for mislabeled fur according to Rosenthal, who wrote the 2007 legislation.

Woody Harrelson narrates a video for HSUS that gives some very basic facts about how living animals are turned into fur products — don’t worry, they use a stuffed animal for demonstration purposes, no images of violence to real animals:

Are you opposed to wearing fur? It will be an unwelcome surprise, then, to learn that you may have some hanging in your closet.

“Fur is back in a big way,” Jezebel has announced. Winter coats sport fur trim around the hoods, but that is just the beginning. Jezebel says that designer houses’ shows previewing their fall lines were heavy on fur, including those of BCBG Max Azria, Caroline Herrera, Ralph Lauren and J. Mendel.

Sadly it looks like time to break out the red paint again. But how can we distinguish between real and fake fur coats, and between people who knowingly bought real fur and people who thought their fur was fake?

People who oppose fur buy it accidentally because some clothing manufacturers and sellers are mislabeling it as “faux fur.” Much of it is from raccoon dogs (see the picture above). Both manufacturers and sellers know that Americans are less likely to buy fur if they think it came from a dog or cat, so they say it didn’t.

The fur of rabbits and other animals also winds up mislabeled as faux fur, perhaps because manufacturers realize that there is widespread opposition to using animals for fur and want to capture more customers than they could if they admitted the fur was real. I can’t think of any other reason businesses would mislabel clothing, especially since their inaccurate labels violate federal law.

An investigation into New York City’s popular discount department store Century 21 revealed real furs masquerading as fake both in the store and online. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and New York Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal conducted an undercover probe and discovered that garments with real fur lining and others with real fur trim were labeled as faux fur or were not labeled at all.

HSUS then went online and bought three Marc Jacobs jackets from Century 21′s website, which described the garments as having fake fur trim. When the jackets arrived, lo and behold — they carried labels stating that the trim was real fur from China. HSUS had the trim on one of the jackets examined and confirmed that it came from a raccoon dog. Under New York law both manufacturers and retailers are liable for mislabeled fur according to Rosenthal, who wrote the 2007 legislation.

Woody Harrelson narrates a video for HSUS that gives some very basic facts about how living animals are turned into fur products — don’t worry, they use a stuffed animal for demonstration purposes, no images of violence to real animals. You can watch this video on you tube.

China is the largest source of fur in the world. Fur farmers there strangle, bludgeon, and electrocute some of the animals to death — the lucky ones. The rest are skinned alive.

The only way to be sure you are not buying real fur is not to buy anything represented as faux fur either. If you think you have found an instance of mislabeling, contact HSUS.

Raccoon Dogs Skinned Alive to Make Boots

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/faux-fur-is-often-real-fur-from-real-animals-dont-buy-it.html#ixzz2gFSytdT0

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/faux-fur-is-often-real-fur-from-real-animals-dont-buy-it.html#ixzz2gFQsWlcd

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4 comments

  1. Well researched article. I am actually glad I came across it, as I had no idea about faux fur being in some cases, real fur. I look forward to reading more of your blogs Val.

    Like

  2. thank you Val for this very informative article, pretending real fur is faux fur, that is so discusting and fraudulant also. I hope to read more.

    Like

  3. Bravo, Valérie pour votre blog très intéressant et bien réaliser, c’est vrai que tout le monde ne le sait pas , que la fausse fourrure provient des chiens ou de chats de chine.
    comme le dit Joanna c’est frauduleux je pensait que la fausse fourrure était synthétique,

    Like

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